Posts tagged ‘Nairobi’

June 29th, 2010

Liberty University Should be Lauded

The past two months have been one of the hardest times of my life as a Christian. It has been gut-wrenching to read about ex-Muslims being attacked by Muslims and some Christians alike. I had some sleepless nights because I could not fathom how some Christians could give Muslims a platform. Not especially when they knew Mohammad Khan has declared his war on other ex-Muslims, indiscriminately raising doubts about their past merely based on “absolutes” in Islam, their accents of Arabic (Islamic) terms and their non-Islamic (Arabic) names even when he had no prior knowledge of their background. I still don’t understand how Christians fell for such a ruse.

Liberty University committee investigating Dr. Ergun Caner’s background has concluded its findings and the final decision has been made. He is going to relinquish his post as president and dean of the seminary but remain on as a professor of apologetics. I hope this decision marks the demise of attacks on ex-Muslims and the beginning of healing for us Christians who have been squabbling publicly. I hope we have learned from this ordeal.

I knew from the outset that Mr. Khan was majoring in lies. He was concerned that “Allah’s light” was being extinguished thus employing certain absolutes in Islam that are no absolute after all. Dr. Caner did not help the situation either because he gave opportunities to his critics to raise doubts. I am hoping that we tread on carefully next time similar questions are raised about a Christian brother or sister of Muslim background. The fact that Mr. Khan has other videos of ex-Muslims he accuses of being fake ex-Muslims should be a conspicuous clue that we should take whatever he presents with a grain of salt.

I have a very low opinion of these ex-Muslims bashers. Here are a few reasons. First, when I challenged Mr. Khan’s interpretation of Islam in April, he quickly demanded that I post my findings juxtaposing the Arabic commentary with my interpretation in English. This comes from a man who admitted to a Southern Baptist blog audience in February that he couldn’t read well, let alone understand, Arabic.

Second, I know for a fact that Mr. Khan has not read my autobiography, Cracks in the Crescent, and yet he reviewed and rated it here. Other Muslims have not read it either and still that did not stop them from reviewing and rating it here. Now that tells us about their objectivity in their presentations of any ex-Muslim’s background.

Third, when my asylum petition was denied and it made the Associated Press wire, Mr. Khan and his Muslim friends jumped on it, copying the links to articles on Facebook, other websites and Twitter. (Some Muslims even edited the official AP release and added “due to the many discrepancies in his accounts” to it and then posted it on my book’s fan page masquerading it as part of the original AP article.) How desperate can they get! Mr. Khan had a reason for suspecting that I was a fake ex-Muslim. First of all, my legal name (Wario Zachariah Abarufa Hussein) is different from my penname (Hussein Hajji Wario). Instead of asking for a clarification, he jumped on it declaring me a fake ex-Muslim merely based on my name. For the record, my name has changed through the years. I go by aliases as well. I often misspell my name for security reasons when participating in events or go just by one name. Zachariah is my baptismal name. Abarufa (correctly spelled Abbarufa) is an Orma (my people group) nickname that my mother’s midwife gave to me. I added these names to my official name on April 10, 1995. Hussein is my given name and Hajji Wario was my father’s name. The reverse in the order and the misspelling of Abbarufa happened because a Kenyan government official wrote it that way on my official identification card, perhaps because I could not bribe to get the document, and hence it is stuck legally :) I attempted at least to reverse the order of my name in 1998 when I visited Kenya (which I explained in my autobiography in Chapter fourteen) but I was unsuccessful because some Christians (irony) bombed the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi in August 1998. I still have the official U.S. government document (I-20) that I was issued to change my name on the U.S. visa. So, if some concerned Muslims really want to find out who I really am, they are welcome to pay a visit to Kenya. Go to Garsen in the Tana River district and ask for my family. They should also ask Muslim leaders in Mombasa why they have not made their rebuttal to my autobiography public. They had a problem with the opening line of chapter fifteen, “Islam is its own worst enemy…” and were supposed to make their findings public at a press conference after Jumaah (Friday) Prayer on March 20, 2009. I am still waiting.

Fourth, I seriously doubt that Muslims started this endeavor to find the truth but distract and confuse Christians. I know it for a fact because when I wrote a post, “Lack of Absolutes in Islam Fizzles Attack on Ex-Muslim,” Muslims started a rumor on Facebook that my website was spreading a Trojan virus. They were warning people on Dr. Ergun Caner’s fan page not to go to my website. Complains were coming from the same group of Muslims that frequented the page with links deriding Dr. Caner. That virus must have been very selective to attack only Muslim computers! Even when Christians reassured them that there were no viruses, Muslims still maintained their story. Now that tells you how much truth they were seeking in this matter.

Brethren, our lack of restraints has caused irreparable damage to Christian outreach to Muslims. We have made it far worse than Dr. Ergun Caner did. I find it quite disturbing how some of us justified the public discussion and judgment of Dr. Caner while the same call for restraint when it comes to recent public arrest of Christian apologetics in Dearborn, Michigan. Our continued discussion of Dr. Caner simply because Liberty decided against making its report public is not justified. In fact, we should laud Liberty for not availing information that detractors of ex-Muslims could use as a trophy. (Some Muslims are waiting to put an icing on their cake.) The more we discuss this now irrelevant issue, the more irrelevant our ministries will become. Instead, let us employ the same fervor and vigor we exhibited in our discussion of Dr. Caner in our outreach and evangelism efforts. We must overcome our manmade theological differences. The time for healing division among Christians has come.

To read the first four chapters of Cracks in the Crescent on Google Books, click here.